HISTORY OF COMA

1988

Back in the late 80’s, the Coma Club revolutionised parties/club nights in Copenhagen. As a counter- reaction to the boring and predictable discotheque culture – with its built-in fear of good dance music. The lucky ones who slipped through the eye of the needle were encased in to this inferno of hot dance floors, side by side with other imaginative existences…

 …A hybrid culture across social scales, races and sexual beliefs. E.g. the guy in the suit that was sewn with milk cartons. Or the 100kg heavy girl dressed only in garter belts. A melting pot of hedonism, clothing, music and madness. A collective unit where the password was: HAPPY. 

2004

COMA’s dancing guests underwent an almost magical transformation on their way through the promised door. For the COMA parties, it was about the extreme, to be free of the shackles. The music was exuberant, the dance floors were packed and there were many rooms to explore. It was well- planned chaos and madness that Kenneth Bager and the rest of the COMA team slam directly in the face of the Copenhageners. It was an instant success! 

2007

The door policy of the COMA parties was tight and an important part of the concept, reminiscent of studio 54 in New York a little decade earlier. Not only did the Coma Club cater to its crowd but it also succeeded in communicating that it was not about bling, credit cards, expensive designer clothes and the kind of silent unimaginative uniforms. It was about individualism, pushing the boundaries, being excited for a party and radiating it. It was about flirting, arousal and sex…

 

2010

…An imaginative and colourful fashion show – textile creativity for full blowout. The Coma Club members participated and understood that they were an indispensable asset to the party. You never just participated in a COMA party; you were a part of it. A boundary breaking, real life theatre full of surprises, where imaginative play inspired the curiosity topped with a touch of madness. 

 

2011

It didn’t matter if you were rockstar material, a golden boy with the red Ferrari flashing his wealth with exuberance without a care in the world, or if you simply showed up 3 minutes past midnight, it didn’t matter. You obviously didn’t catch on to our philosophy and the door remained closed! Therefore, you missed out on the celebrations and shenanigans inside. 

2012

2013

The Coma Club broke all boundaries of what you expected at a wild party. The parties were revolutionary because they took the usual perception of it and blasted it out of this world! Yes, the rumours of the loose COMA parties reached many a metropolis in this world. There was even a band from Belgium named after “Coma Club “

2014

Party promoters in the period after the very last of the legendary 80’s COMA parties were now subsequently exempt from concerns about whether their own events, underground celebrations, etc. had gone too far beyond the boundary between the insane and the ‘out there’!…

 

…The COMA bus had long smashed through the fence with a Kenneth Bager hanging upside down, bare chested, tights on and a little odd hat whilst track “KAOS!” was booming out of the speakers over 120

 decibels. 

2015

The Coma Club produces lots of epic and small moments, which for many people last for a long time. E.g. The story of the guy who had sewed suit from postcards, or the girl who came rolling in black scaffolding with huge full beard, plasters on her nipples and a little piquant cross between the legs…

2016

2017

…Also, the environmentally friendly type that came out dressed like a living lawn, asking kindly: “Who has seen my lawnmower.” Or the girl who arrived at the door, pleasing the team in wearing only high heels and a home-made, extremely well-liked 100% transparent cellophane dress. 

2018

…At the entrance, she replied to Kenneth Bager’s enthusiasm with a dry and confident glimpse of the eye. “Then you should have seen how they were glowing in the bus …” 

2019

In 2004 the Coma Club was restarted because there were just no parties in the world with similar ideas. COMA’s dancing guests underwent an almost magical transformation from 2004 to 2017 and from 2018 to this day the growth of the club has expanded from 1.500 guests to more than 3.000 attending – without losing its integrity and power of the party.

No parties in 2020 due to the corona virus.

2020

COMA is not only a club. The guests spend months planning their costumes & make-up. The music is exuberant, the dance floors are packed and there are always many rooms to explore. It is well-planned chaos and madness that Christian Dalholt and Kenneth Bager, and the rest of the COMA team slam directly in the face of the Copenhageners and visitors from around the world. It has become following.

See you in 2021